How to Replace Pokemon Gold Battery with a Soldering Iron

Find our VGM Gold 3.8mm Security Bit on Amazon or eBay.

Warning: Proceed at your own risk and be careful when doing any repairs.

In the past we’ve show how to replace your lithium battery without soldering.  It’s quick.  It’s easy.  But so is soldering with a little practice.  Plus, it turns out that the solder method is a bit stronger as it is how these game-saving power supplies were installed in the first place.

Best part is that this method works for Pokémon Gold, Silver, Crystal, Blue, Red, Yellow, plus Zelda games, Tecmo Super Bowl, and a bunch of other retro video games.

Here’s what you’ll need:

FAQ

(Ok, so a lot of these FAQs were handled in our Solderless Repair Guide and have been recycled below.)

Q: Why can’t I save my game on my old Pokémon Game Boy Color cartridge?
A: Before game systems saved games on flash memory and hard drives, games relied on lithium batteries to maintain saved games. Unfortunately, when that battery dies, so does the saved game. It’s sort of like taking the battery out of your watch. Once the battery is gone, the watch loses the time.

Q: My cartridge lets me save the game, but when I turn it on later the saved game is gone. Is my battery dead?
A: Yes, without a working battery, the game will attempt to save and then lose the saved game data after you power off your Game Boy. Bummer, huh?!

Q: How powerful of a soldering iron do I need?
A:   We’d suggest one with 25 or more watts.  Ideally, you’d get one that has a temperature control to find a setting that works best for you.

Q: I don’t have a soldering iron.  Can I use a flame thrower, light saber, or other implement of destruction?
A:   Hmmm…please make a video of said attempts…using proper safety methods for each of course.

Q: Which Pokémon games does this repair method address?
A:   We’ve used it to repair Pokémon Gold, Silver, Crystal, Red Version, Blue Version, and Yellow Version (Special Pikachu Edition).  These include Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald versions.

Q: Did I see a FireRed GBA cart in the video?
A: Yeah, we accidentally showed a Pokémon FireRed cart in the video, but it actually doesn’t use a battery. Ha ha, that cartridge looks so much like Ruby at first glance that we mixed them up during filming.

Q: My battery is dead. Will replacing it restore my saved game?
A: Unfortunately, when the battery dies, your saved game files are lost.  It’s sort of like unplugging your alarm clock.  Once it loses power, it loses track of what it saves, which in the case of an alarm clock is the time.  The exception to this is GBA games which only relied on the battery for an in-game clock.  That in-game clock affected things like berry growth.

Q: My battery is old but still working, is there any way to switch the battery without losing the game save?
A:  When you remove the battery, your saved game will be lost.  If you’re thinking about putting in a fresh battery, you should back up your saved game to a device like a Mega Memory Card.  You can also do certain backups using a N64 transfer pak and Pokemon Stadium 2.  Check out this thread for tips on this.

Q:  What size battery do I need?
A:  Most likely, if you’re replacing a battery for a Pokemon Game Boy Color cartridge, you’ll need a CR2025 Lithium battery.  However, some cartridges originally used a CR2016.  When you remove the existing battery, you can check its labeling or for battery size information stamped on the board next to the battery.

Q:  Does this repair work for Game Boy Advance Pokémon games on the GBA?
A:  Yup, you can use the same method to repair Pokémon games for the GBA and GBA SP.  These include Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald versions.

Q:  Does this repair work for games of other systems?
A:  Yes, you can use the exact same method to repair games for the Original NES, Super Nintendo, Nintendo 64, Sega Genesis, Game Boy Advance and other older cartridge based games.  This is especially helpful if have an original Nintendo Entertainment System and want to fix your Legend of Zelda, Dragon Warrior, Final Fantasy, or Tecmo Super Bowl carts.  There are way too many games that use batteries than we can list for these systems.  If you have one with a battery, chances are this method will work just fine.

Q:  Can I use a solderless method instead of soldering the batteries back into place?
A:  Most people don’t know how to solder and don’t have any friends who do either.  While we admire those people who can restore their games through the process of soldering, we want to teach this simple and effective method that most anyone can do.  In our opinion, our no solder method involves less risk of having a person who is new to video game repair hurt themselves or the game cartridge.  Plus, we’ve been pretty happy with the success of the no soldering method.

Q:  How do I open my game cartridge?
A:  Many games require security bits to open them.  We suggest using a  VGM Gold 3.8mm Security Bit.

Q:  Do I really need a security bit to open my cartridge?
A:  Using the correct tool is definitely the easiest and safest way to open your cartridge.  However, others have gotten creative in using thin needle nosed pliers, tweezers, and even modified Bic Pens.  I’ve even heard of a guy (@roxas8137) using a Dremel tool to carve a flat slot in the screw for a normal screwdriver. We suggest getting a security bits since they’re cheap, easy to use, and have lowest risk of scratching or damaging your game.  Note: We also strongly discourage the use of dynamite, chainsaws or pet saber-toothed tigers in opening your game cart as these tend to damage the internal components.

Q:  How long can I expect my battery to last?
A:  The easiest way to figure this out would be to take the year the game was released and to subtract that from the year the battery died.  Speaking in broad terms though, the original batteries in games like Pokemon Gold (generally using CR2025) seemed to last 10-12 years or more.  Amazingly, original batteries in The Legend of Zelda NES cartridges (generally using CR2032) have been know to last 25+ years!  Everything seems to depend on the size of the battery (larger CR2032>CR2025>CR2016>CR1616 smaller), the quality, and the amount of drain placed on the battery.  Regarding drain, games with a continuous clock or items like a Dreamcast’s VMU are always drawing power from the battery. However, a Legend of Zelda Cart simply uses its battery to maintain the saved game.  If you replace your battery, it won’t last forever, but you can probably get a good number of years out of it.

Q:  Can I put a CR2032 battery into a game that previously had a CR2025?
A:  I always like to replace with the exact same battery type that it originally used.  Both the CR2032 and CR2025 are 3V batteries. In my understanding, the main difference is that the CR2032 is 3.2mm in thickness and the CR2025‘s is 2.5mm in thickness.  Additionally, the CR2032 should give longer battery life.  Proceed at your own risk if you’re going to mismatch batteries.  But…we’d gladly use the larger battery for our own games.

Q:  I tried to replace my battery, and it isn’t working.  What did I do wrong?
A1:  Make sure that the battery is in correctly (Positive matching + and Negative matching -).
A2:  Sometimes it helps to wrap a thin strip of electrical tape around the edge of the battery.  This can help to prevent a metal contact from touching both the battery’s positive and negative sizes simultaneously.
A3:  Try cleaning the game and board.  The metal contacts most commonly need cleaning.  We suggest using a Qtip or cloth dampened with rubbing alcohol or WD-40 to clean the contacts.
A4:  Are you certain that your game worked in the first place?  If your little brother dropped it in the toilet 15 years ago and you’re hoping this will get it to work, chances are your game will still have issues.

Your Feedback:

We would love your feedback!  Please comment on the YouTube video or Facebook with your questions and comments.  Thanks!

Introducing the 3.8mm VGM Gold Security Screwdrive​​r Bit

After months of design, engineering and production, we’re happy to announce our new 3.8mm VGM Gold Security Screwdrive​​r Bit!

Get your 3.8mm VGM Gold Security Bit on Amazon or eBay

We’re demonstrating all the different types of cartridges a 3.8mm VGM Gold Security bit can open. This is perfect for opening your retro gaming collection for cleaning, battery replacement, and repairs.

3.8MM VERSION OPENS:

  • Original NES Nintendo game cartridges
  • Super Nintendo game cartridges
  • Nintendo 64 game cartridges
  • Original Game Boy game cartridges
  • Game Boy Color game cartridges
  • Virtual Boy game cartridges
  • Sega Game Gear game cartridges

QUALITY:

  • Durable strong hardened steel
  • Heat treated for maximum strength
  • Length is about 7.6 cm (~3 inches)
  • Gold colored for identification and corrosion resistance
  • Precision engineered teeth fit tightly
  • Pattern: 3.8mm Female 6 Node (6-Pointed Star)
  • Fit any 1/4″ hex hand tool receiver
  • Made in the USA

We’ve worked hard to offer the highest quality screwdriver security bits on the market. We’d rather offer a top quality item once rather than ask people to continuously replace low quality imitations.  We feel we’ve done just that and our proud that these are made 100% in the United States.  This gives us highest quality control, top quality, and supports American jobs.

Get your 3.8mm VGM Gold Security Bit on Amazon or eBay

Gaming at the 2013 San Diego Fair

San Diego Fair Sign Custom (1)Game On Gaming Area (13)Star Trek Captain Kirk's Chair Tribble

If you live in the San Diego area and love gaming, today is the last day to Game On at the San Diego Fair!  Besides all the rides, great food, pig races, and other goofy fair stuff, this year’s theme was perfect for us electronically minded folks.

Our favorite part?

Collections!  Little did we know that the Fair allows people to display their collections.

Hand-made Items!  Created by adults and students, we were blown away by the talent and creativity of these gaming-inspired creations.

Retro Arcade!  Let’s be honest, shouldn’t every fair have a retro arcade?

 

Easily Repair Your Pokemon Game Boy Color Cartridge

Want to repair your Pokémon Game Boy Color cartridge?  Here’s our super easy guide for fixing your game and getting it to save again.

FAQ

Q:  Why can’t I save my game on my old Pokémon Game Boy Color cartridge?
A:  Before game systems saved games on flash memory and hard drives, games relied on lithium batteries to maintain saved games.  Unfortunately, when that battery dies, so does the saved game.  It’s sort of like taking the battery out of your watch.  Once the battery is gone, the watch loses the time.

Q:  My cartridge lets me save the game, but when I turn it on later the saved game is gone.  Is my battery dead?
A:  Yes, without a working battery, the game will attempt to save and then lose the saved game data after you power off your Game Boy.  Bummer, huh?!

Q:  Which Pokémon games does this repair method address?
A:  We’ve used it to repair Pokémon Gold, Silver, Crystal, Red Version, Blue Version, and Yellow Version (Special Pikachu Edition).  It’ll also work for GBA versions too!

Q: My battery is dead.  Will replacing it restore my saved game?
A:  Unfortunately, when the battery dies, your saved game files are lost.

Q:  My battery is old but still working, is there any way to switch the battery without losing the game save?
A:  When you remove the battery, your saved game will be lost.  If you’re thinking about putting in a fresh battery, you should back up your saved game to a device like a Mega Memory Card.

Q:  What size battery do I need?
A:  Most likely, if you’re replacing a battery for a Pokemon Game Boy Color cartridge, you’ll need a CR2025 Lithium battery.  However, some cartridges originally used a CR2016.  When you remove the existing battery, you can check its labeling or for battery size information stamped on the board next to the battery.

Q:  Does this repair work for Game Boy Advance Pokémon games on the GBA?
A:  Yup, you can use the same method to repair Pokémon games for the GBA and GBA SP.  These include Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald versions.

Q:  Does this repair work for games of other systems?
A:  Yes, you can use the exact same method to repair games for the Original NES, Super Nintendo, Nintendo 64, Sega Genesis, Game Boy Advance and other older cartridge based games.  This is especially helpful if have an original Nintendo Entertainment System and want to fix your Legend of Zelda, Dragon Warrior, Final Fantasy, or Tecmo Super Bowl carts.  There are way too many games that use batteries than we can list for these systems.  If you have one with a battery, chances are this method will work just fine.

Q:  Why do you use a solderless method instead of soldering the batteries back into place?
A:  Most people don’t know how to solder and don’t have any friends who do either.  While we admire those people who can restore their games through the process of soldering, we want to teach this simple and effective method that most anyone can do.  In our opinion, our no solder method involves less risk of having a person who is new to video game repair hurt themselves or the game cartridge.  Plus, we’ve been pretty happy with the success of the no soldering method.

Q:  How do I open my game cartridge?
A:  Many games require security bits to open them.  We suggest using a  VGM Gold 3.8mm Security Bit. Just check out our security tool and battery chart to figure out which one you need.

Q:  Do I really need a security bit to open my cartridge?
A:  Using the correct tool is definitely the easiest and safest way to open your cartridge.  However, others have gotten creative in using thin needle nosed pliers, tweezers, and even modified Bic Pens.  I’ve even heard of a guy (@roxas8137) using a Dremel tool to carve a flat slot in the screw for a normal screwdriver. We suggest getting a security bits since they’re cheap, easy to use, and have lowest risk of scratching or damaging your game.

Q:  How long can I expect my battery to last?
A:  The easiest way to figure this out would be to take the year the game was released and to subtract that from the year the battery died.  Speaking in broad terms though, the original batteries in games like Pokemon Gold (generally using CR2025) seemed to last 10-12 years or more.  Amazingly, original batteries in The Legend of Zelda NES cartridges (generally using CR2032) have been know to last 25+ years!  Everything seems to depend on the size of the battery (larger CR2032>CR2025>CR2016>CR1616 smaller), the quality, and the amount of drain placed on the battery.  Regarding drain, games with a continuous clock or items like a Dreamcast’s VMU are always drawing power from the battery. However, a Legend of Zelda Cart simply uses its battery to maintain the saved game.  If you replace your battery, it won’t last forever, but you can probably get a good number of years out of it.

Q:  Can I put a CR2032 battery into a game that previously had a CR2025?
A:  I always like to replace with the exact same battery type that it originally used.  Both the CR2032 and CR2025 are 3V batteries. In my understanding, the only difference is that the CR2032 is 3.2mm in thickness and the CR2025‘s is 2.5mm in thickness.  Additionally, the CR2032 should give longer battery life.  Proceed at your own risk if you’re going to mismatch batteries.

Q:  I tried to replace my battery, and it isn’t working.  What did I do wrong?
A1:  Make sure that the battery is in correctly (Positive matching + and Negative matching -).
A2:  Sometimes it helps to wrap a thin strip of electrical tape around the edge of the battery.  This can help to prevent a metal contact from touching both the battery’s positive and negative sizes simultaneously.
A3:  Try cleaning the game and board.  The metal contacts most commonly need cleaning.  We suggest using a Qtip or cloth dampened with rubbing alcohol or WD-40 to clean the contacts.

Q:  Do I have to use electrical tape?
A:  Electrical tape is nonconductive (does not conduct electricity) and is quite inexpensive to purchase.  If you don’t already own some, we strongly suggest purchasing some from your local hardware store.

Q:  I broke one of the brackets off.  What do I do now?
A:  Bummer, but you’re not out of luck.  You’ll need to solder it back on.  If you do some searching on YouTube, you’ll find videos showing you the soldering method.

Your Feedback:

We would love your feedback!  Please comment below with your questions and comments.  Thanks!

Security Bit & Battery Compatibility Chart

Want to clean your video game collection?

Are you trying to repair an old game cartridge or system?

We’ve created a compatibility chart to help you find the items you’ll need.  Want a pdf version?

SECURITY BIT & BATTERY COMPATIBILITY CHART
NINTENDO   GAME BIT SYSTEM BIT CONTROLLER BIT SYSTEM BATTERY GAME BATTERY
Original Nintendo NES  nintendo nes 3.8mm Philips Philips n.a. CR2032
Super Nintendo super nintendo system
3.8mm 4.5mm Philips n.a. CR2032
Nintendo 64  nintendo-64-system 3.8mm 4.5mm Philips n.a. CR2032
Game Cube  nintendo game cube n.a. 4.5mm Tri-Wing n.a. n.a.
Wii  nintendo wii n.a. Tri-Wing Tri-Wing n.a. n.a.
Virtual Boy  nintendo virtual boy 3.8mm 4.5mm1 Philips n.a. n.a.
Game Boy  nintendo game boy 3.8mm Tri-Wing n.a. AA CR2025
Game Boy Color  nintendo game boy color 3.8mm Tri-Wing n.a. AAA Usually CR2025 (but sometimes CR2016)3
Game Boy Advance  nintendo game boy advance Tri-Wing Tri-Wing n.a. AA Usually CR2025 (but sometimes CR2016)3
Game Boy Advance SP  game boy advance sp Tri-Wing Tri-Wing n.a. Lithium Usually CR2025 (but sometimes CR2016)3
DS  nintendo ds system Tri-Wing Tri-Wing n.a. Lithium n.a.
DS Lite  nintendo ds lite system Tri-Wing Tri-Wing n.a. Lithium n.a.
DSi  nintendo dsi Tri-Wing Tri-Wing n.a. Lithium n.a.
DSi XL  nintendo dsi xl system Tri-Wing Tri-Wing n.a. Lithium n.a.
SEGA GAME BIT SYSTEM BIT CONTROLLER BIT SYSTEM BATTERY GAME BATTERY
Master System  sega master system 4.5mm Philips Philips n.a. CR2032
Genesis  sega genesis 4.5mm2 Philips Philips n.a. CR2032
CD sega cd n.a. Philips Philips n.a. n.a.
CDX  sega cdx n.a. Philips Philips n.a. n.a.
32X  sega 32x 4.5mm Philips Philips n.a. CR2032
Saturn  sega saturn n.a. Philips Philips CR2032 n.a.
Dreamcast sega dreamcast n.a. Philips Philips n.a. CR2032 for VMU4
Game Gear sega game gear 3.8mm 4.5mm n.a. AA n.a.
MISC GAME BIT SYSTEM BIT CONTROLLER BIT SYSTEM BATTERY GAME BATTERY
TurboGrafx 16  turbografx 16 system n.a. 4.5mm Philips n.a. n.a.
TurboDuo  nec turboduo system n.a. 4.5mm n.a. n.a. n.a.
CHART KEY
Philips = Philips head screwdriver
Tri-wing = Tri-wing head screwdriver
1Bit may not be long enough to reach screws without removing plastic
2Works for most games
3Check game’s internal circuit board to identify the battery needed. It should be labeled either “CR2025” or “CR2016“.
4The Sega Dreamcast’s VMU requires the use of two (2) CR2032 batteries.

Additional Info: See our video cleaning and repair guides for our favorite methods for easily cleaning and repairing your retro gaming collection.

Sharing: You are welcome to share this chart in unedited form so long as you offer credit linking to VideoGameMuseum.com

Feedback: We would love your feedback!  Please send feedback and suggestions to mark{at}videogamemuseum.com simply comment below.

A Handheld Gaming Timeline

With the great development from Nintendo DS in the 2000’s, handheld gaming continues to be a major force within the entertainment industry. The successes of today’s handheld platforms pay great tribute to the consoles that once dominated our lives, such as the Game Boy and the Game Gear. Sales on smart phone applications, PSP Go and Nintendo 3DS games continue to play a large role in the overall market for video games. A look back over the years proves that there have been plenty of different styles on the way to the current state of handheld gaming and just how far the sector of the market has come.

Milton Bradley released one of the first handheld gaming devices back in 1979 with the Microvision, a large machine with a black and white LCD screen. The system included ready-to-go versions of paddle games and limited play, which led to relatively poor sales. Even though it didn’t stick around, the system was used as a model for later designers of handheld games.

Throughout the mid 1980’s there were a couple more game machines, but none that really stood out. The Entex Select A Game Machine was released in 1981, but was still rather large. It was designed for two players to participate and was usually played on a table where both could sit down and see. The machine contained a vacuum fluorescent display which led to a number of sight issues and a limited amount of video games ultimately had a major effect on its downfall. In 1984, the Epoch Game Pocket Computer set the track for some future systems. It had a black and white LCD display which used cartridges. It was released in Japan, but failed to truly gain any steam, leaving the market open for others.

Before Nintendo really turned the handheld market in its favor, they developed the Game & Watch in the early 1980’s. These platforms are particularly interesting because of their striking resemblance to today’s current DS line. Individual games were released with their own LCD screen, as well as a clock and alarm. Over 60 game & watch titles were developed, as Nintendo has clearly taken strengths such as the dual screen and flip style formatting to develop their popular line today.

The industry was revolutionized in 1989 when Nintendo released the Game Boy platform. It had a long battery life, as well as a number of games available. With over 100 million units sold after its original release, Nintendo went on to develop Advance, Light and Color versions later in the 1990’s. With the upgrades made to the line, it became one of the longest running video game systems in history.

The Game Boy’s main competitor came about in 1990 when Sega released the Game Gear. Even though Atari ($179.95 Lynx at launch) and NEC ($249.99 TurboExpress at launch) had attempted to build systems to compete with Nintendo, they were largely unsuccessful. The Game Gear came in color and was considerably inexpensive with an initial price tage of $149.99 at launch. Also pushing its popularity was the fact that the Sega Genesis was widely popular at the time.

The mid 90’s saw another release from Sega with the Genesis Nomad in 1995. This came at a rough patch for Sega, when it had a number of other releases on the market. The system was one of a kind in that it actually played the same cartridges as a Genesis did, allowing for multiple platform game usage. The Nomad was widely ignored upon its release, leading to poor sales.

Nintendo developed the Virtual Boy in 1995 as the first video game console with true 3D graphics. While larger than most handheld systems, the Virtual Boy could still be towed around pretty easily. The system used LED pixels for a monochrome display, as well as controller built specifically for 3D game play. Unfortunately the reception from the public was pretty lackluster, as many critics panned that the device was ugly and the graphics were subpar.

Tiger Electronics started to become a force within the handheld gaming industry early with a series of handheld titles in the 1980’s similar to the Game & Watch. They became hugely successful with individual releases for a number of popular movies and character games throughout the 80’s and 90’s.  These individual platforms were relatively inexpensive compared to other major consoles, making them very popular. During the late 1990’s, they began to try and cover other parts of the market by developing the game.com. This was the first handheld console to feature touch display and internet connectivity, but ultimately it fell flat with a lack of titles developed.

The market was saturated with smaller name systems throughout the early stages of the 2000’s including releases from Nokia, Bandai and Game Park which were all rather unsuccessful in the United States market. Nintendo released its first non-Gameboy portable device with the DS in 2004. This had two screens including one that was touch controlled. Although first viewed as a failure, the system has gone on to sell millions and stay one of the company’s major products.

PlayStation finally got into the act in 2004 as well with the release of its own Portable device. The PSP was originally viewed as a better product than the DS, but long term sales went against the grain. Even being viewed as somewhat of a competitor, the PSP has still done well sales wise because it still offers some different aspects, especially with updates throughout the last decade.

Today, much of the handheld gaming industry is focused in smart phones and portable music devices such as the iPod Touch. The application marketplace provided by smartphone developers like Apple and Android have allowed for easy access to games that are more than affordable. The availability to games has never been easier than it is now with today’s phones.

Nintendo and PlayStation have been forced to really improve their game play with the widespread availability in the smart phone sector. Nintendo continues to try and spike the initially poor reception of the 3DS by developing more games with online availability into the future. The DS itself went on to success after a slow start, but Nintendo seemed to really miss on the initial price and first party support of the 3DS, hurting its reception.  If they would like to achieve the success of the DS over the long haul, Nintendo will likely have to allow for better virtual sales, as well as firmware updates to help  convince gamers that there is value in not just playing games on their smartphones.

Article Author: Justin Taylor

 

Rare Game Showcase: Xerox Alto Computer, M82, Racermate Carts & More

Would you pay $30,000 for a computer? How about $2,500 for a Nintendo promotional item?  Collectors love eBay, and this past few weeks’ sales demonstrate that well.  Here are some of my favorite active and ended rare video game items on eBay.

Interesting Items on eBay

Rare Huffy Space Invader Muscle Bike Bidding is $40.00 USD with less than a day remaining.  Ummm, how isn’t this the most awesome thing ever?

Nintendo NES Mike Tyson Punchout Standee 1988 Bidding is $51.00 USD with less than a day remaining.  That’s not a bad price since one of these sold in 2009 for $445.00.

Super Mario Bros Sleeping Bag Bidding is only $8.00 with one day remaining.

World of Nintendo Superbrite M36R Promo Sign Bidding is currently $143.39 with one day remaining.

…This is a superbrite series made by Thomas A. Schutz Co. … The sign has World of Nintendo on both sides, except one side lights up and the other side does not. So I figure this was probably made for a store window to light up the outside and be able to also read it from the inside. … The signs measurements are 36 1/2″ long, 16″ tall, and 6″ deep.

Nintendo DS Neon Sign Starting bid is $50.00 USD.

Super Chair Nintendo Controller Accessory Bidding is currently $100.00 with 4 days remaining.

RACERMATE Challenge II Starting bid of $9.99 USD.

NES Super Stars 5 Game Store Display With a buy it now of $499.99, I’m doubting this will sell.  However, it’s an undeniably awesome way to display your 5 favorite NES games in their boxes.

Ended Items on eBay

Project Natal Animals (Kinectimals) Kinect ***RARE*** Sold Nov. 4, 2010 for $212.50 USD.

Racermate Challenge II Sold Nov. 3, 2010 for $211.38 USD.  This lot also included a top loader NES as well as the controller adapter for the Racermate cart.

Nintendo Mario 1988 Media Kit Rare Original MINT Sold Nov. 2, 2010 for $115.39 USD.

1988 Super Mario Bros. Zelda Pillow Case sold Nov. 1, 2010 for only $3.99.

Nintendo M82 Kiosk Sold Oct. 20, 2010 for $2,500.00 USD.

Xerox Alto Vintage Computer System Sold Oct. 17, 2010 for $30,1000.00 USD.  Yeah, that’s typed correctly.  This computer sold for thirty thousand dollars!

You are looking at a system-complete, never commercially sold Xerox Alto. This is grandfather of all modern computing. First produced in 1973, the Alto was WAY ahead of it’s time, including:

1) Full ethernet networking

2) A 3 button Mouse (first in a non-DARPA computer)

3) a Full-page portrait CRT

4) Graphical user interface

5) The first WYSIWYG word processor

6) The first integrated email application

7) The first graphical network based computer game (Alto Trek!)

8) The first WYSIWYG integrated circuit design software

9) The first implementation of the Smalltalk development environment

10) Bitmapped graphics, menu’s, icons, the “folder” metaphor for storage, etc….

11) Removable storage – 2.5 Megabyte (yes, megabyte!)

1980 Pac Man Phone Telephone Sold Oct. 13, 2010 for $29.99 USD.

Nintendo 1988 Media Kit Rare Vintage Original MINT Sold Oct. 12, 2010 for $122.43 USD.

Nintendo Game Boy Training Module Vintage Rare MINT Sold Oct. 12, 2010 for $77.82 USD.