Between the Toes of the Giant: Gam3rCon

Gam3rCon (2)San Diego Comic Con is a beast.  It’s the biggest, baddest giant in town.  Yet, surprisingly, growing between its toes is an event called Gam3rCon!  Rather than withering in SDCC‘s shadow, Gam3rCon is thriving!Gam3rCon Main Floor Racing (1)

In some ways, I scratch my head that there are gamers who live in the San Diego area and don’t attend Comic Con.  Some are just not interested, or they’re interested but couldn’t get a ticket.  Others would attend SDCC but hate all the hype and crowds.

That’s where Gam3rCon comes in.  It’s small. It’s gaming.  It’s not Comic Con.  This was our first year to check it out, and I have to say I was impressed!

Gam3rCon Main Floor (4)Ok, so Gam3rCon is small and independent…but not really that small.  These guys and gals rent out a five story building and pack it with an insane amount of content.  Upon entering, a gamer walks into an old church sanctuary that has been converted to a shrine to gaming with dozens of Xbox 360s and PS3s.  Shooters, fighters, and DoTA seemed to dominate the scene, while a driving simulator was projected on the wall.

Gam3rCon Retro Gaming Room (3)All the while, upstairs is a retro gaming room complete with Atari, NES, SNES, N64, Dreamcast, PS2 and a freak’n rad Fairchild Channel F!  Yup, that’s the room where I parked for a bit.

Down the hall is an art gallery with some solid works of art, and if you’re interested in creating your own art, we spotted some graffiti and silk screening going on as well.  Did we mention the huge, green-screen photo booth for those of us who are less than artistic?!  Check out our interview with Mr. Benja from The 8-bit Cubist for more on that art gallery:

If tabletop gaming is more your thing, there was plenty of that going on in the tabletop gaming lounge.  Up on the roof was pizza and comedy.  Add to that film screenings and a bunch of other stuff that we probably didn’t even find, and there’s something for everyone.

If you’re thinking about doing both San Diego Comic Con and Gam3rCon, we wish you all the best.  Both are great and worth checking out.  As a pretty active guy in his 30s, I was hurting after packing both into one day.  If they were staggered by a week or two, I would have loved spending more time at both.  Yeah, I know, cry me a river, right?

Regardless, I’m stoked that there is one more gaming option in Southern California.  Best of all, this small, independent gaming con is thriving!  Game on!

Check out the gallery below for a closer look at Gam3rCon.

Fixing Cheetahmen II: Kickstarter vs Dr. Morbis!

Oh Cheetahmen II…are you finally getting fixed?!

For decades, the Cheetahmen have been locked in a bitter and futile struggle against Dr. Morbis.  In Cheetahmen II, every two levels a different Cheetahmen becomes available.  Theoretically, a player starts with Apollo (crossbow) for the first two levels, gets to play as Aries (fists) for the third and fourth levels, and uses Hercules (dual clubs) for the fifth and sixth levels.  Unfortunately, the Cheetahmen’s feline courage and ninja skills have not been enough to pass the mutant Ape Man boss at the end of the fourth level.  A software bug has thwarted years of insanely skilled and strangely dedicated players from ever getting to level five.  Ironically, it turns out that beating Cheetahmen II is even more rare than this holy grail of NES cartridges.

Broken Ape Man boss fight in Cheetahmen II

Will we finally be able to help the Cheetahmen defeat Dr Morbis?

Last week, I had the opportunity to chat on the phone with Greg Pabich find to find out about his newest project.  Since I was polite enough not to record the conversation, here’s a paraphrased version of our discussion:

Mark:  Hey Greg, how’s it going?

Greg:  Mark, I’ve been pretty busy!  I’m excited about our next Cheetahmen project!

Mark:  Ha ha!  Oh dear!?!  What’ve you been up to?

Greg:  Well, you know how that pallet of Cheetahmen II cartridges never made it to market?

Mark:  Yeah, collectors love them, but what a frustrating game.

Greg:  When Active Enterprises was about to go under, I’m guessing Vince Perri abandoned them either because money wasn’t coming in on the Action 52 like he figured or because he realized it was an incomplete game.

Mark:  Yeah, you can only even play the first four levels, right?

Greg:  Exactly!  So here’s what I’m up to.  I think the world needs to have that game up and working.  Love it or hate it, it just needs to get finished and put on a cartridge.

Mark:  Now that would be interesting.

Greg:  The original Cheetahmen II game carts are selling for thousands of dollars now.  Most collectors can’t even begin to afford them.  I want to put together a playable cartridge that will have all the levels working.  Apparently, it was originally designed with more levels, but it was just too buggy to let anyone play them.  Once we have a working game with all its original levels working, I’d love to put them into NES collectors’ hands.

Mark:  What’s the game plan going to be for doing that?

Greg:  I put a small fortune into producing and distributing the Cheetahmen Creation cartridge last year.  Between development, production, marketing, and selling a repaired version of Cheetahmen 2, I know it’s going to cost some serious cash.  I’m thinking Kickstarter will be a great tool to launch this project.

Mark:  That’s probably wise.  Plus, from one married man to another, I have a feeling your wife might like the Kickstarter plan a bit better than trying to fund it all yourself.  So, I know people love, hate, and pretty much love to hate Action 52 and Cheetahmen 2.  What’s going to get people to back this project?

Greg:  Kickstarter has a great model of letting people support a project and get something unique as a thank you for their support.  We have some pretty reasonable donation levels, and based on how much people donate, we’ll have things available ranging from exclusive posters to actual cartridges of the game once we get it produced.  I’ve got Mario Gonzalez, one of the original designers of Action 52/Cheetahmen involved, and he’s created some fantastic new artwork for the posters and will be signing certain items!  Plus, most items will be numbered and hologram stickered as limited editions available only to contributors.

Mark:  Actually, that a pretty good plan.  I’m a pretty big NES collector, and this might be a much more reasonable way for me to get a copy of Cheetahmen II into my collection even if it isn’t the original.  I’m guessing you could get some good buzz in collecting circles around this.

Greg:  Actually, we’re going to go bigger than that.  By sheer coincidence, the Angry Video Game Nerd (AVGN) just did a video on Cheetahmen II!

After seeing it, I contacted him to see if he’d be interested in getting involved in this.  The AVGN signed on, which is going to be a ton of fun and nuts as usual!  I got Pat the NES Punk involved as well.  We were sponsors in his last NES Marathon, which turned out to be a huge success.  Plus, the Game Chasers guys from Retroware TV are involved and basically putting it all together.

Mark:  Wow, seriously, that’s an amazing lineup!  Are you making any video appearances yourself?

Greg:  Yeah!  It turns out that acting isn’t so easy though.  I’ve finished working on my parts.  The Game Chasers are putting it all together.  It’s 100% top notch production and coming along nicely!  I think people are going to be blown away by the AVGN, Pat, the Game Chasers, and some possible appearances of the Cheetahmen themselves…

Mark:  Greg, sounds like you’re going 100% in as usual.  When are you launching this?

Greg:  The Kickstarter campaign should go live 8/7/2012.

Mark:  And, any idea when you’re hoping to have new copies of the fixed Cheetahmen II game available?

Greg:  In good Active Enterprises spirit, sticking to Vince Perri’s 3 month development window would put us in November or December.  Either way, I’m guessing we should probably get this done before the world ends in 12/12/12.

Mark:  Ha ha, nice!  Even once it’s fixed, I’m hoping that Cheetahmen II won’t be the last NES game I ever play.  But seriously, I’ve got to hand it to you.  It sounds like this is going to be a ton of fun and a huge success.  Best of luck with it!

Greg:  Absolutely!  Thanks for helping to spread the word on Cheetahmen II: The Lost Levels.

Update 8/6/2012:  The Kickstarter project CHEETAHMEN II : THE LOST LEVELS is live!  Best of luck Greg!

MeatBun’s Love for the Neo Geo AES

Compared to the Neo Geo MVS arcade machine, my beloved childhood Nintendo seemed like an ant among giants. In the small Michigan town where I grew up, the only arcade in town was at the local roller rink. I was simply in awe of the MVS, and perhaps even more perplexed by the idea that some kid, in a galaxy quantum leaps away, could have a home version of the Neo Geo.

At the recent 2012 San Diego Comic-Con, I was delighted to meet Jason Rau! Not only does meatbun.us create fantastic retro gaming themed clothing, but Jason Rau is also one of the few people I’ve met who had a Neo Geo AES as a kid / young adult!

Check out this video if you also dreamed of owning Neo Geo’s home version and if you’d like to learn about the radness that is MeatBun.us. These guys make some pretty stink’n creative retro-gaming-inspired art…that conveniently takes the form of lovely t-shirts.

Double Dragon vs Double Abobo Fists!?

So, you’re playing Double Dragon and get thumped on by a big dude named Abobo…

Do you lie awake wondering about Abobo’s back story?
Do you ask yourself if Abobo is actually ALSO fighting to save someone he loves?
Do you daydream about whether or not Abobo could fit into a Megaman suit or about whether or not he could hold his own as one of the Contra guys?

Well if you’re answered “YES” to any of these questions, you’re not alone! All the answers and more lie within Abobo’s Big Adventure!

Seriously, who would be crazy enough to rewrite NES gaming history around the Double Dragon character Abobo?! Clearly insanity and brilliance go hand in hand, because Abobo is both bad & rad enough to knock the socks of the 8-bit generation!

Our thanks to Nick and Roger from Abobo’s Big Adventure for doing an interview with us at the 2012 San Diego Comic Con!

Interested in building your own Abobo’s Big Adventure arcade cabinet?  These guys were kind enough to include instructions here.

Is Magneto the Perfect Pinball Villain?

Any X-Men fan knows that Magneto+metal makes for a pretty serious foe…one that very few of us would be crazy enough to tackle.  Given pinball machines’ usage of steel balls, that makes him a nearly perfect villain for Stern Pinball’s newest machine.  Not only is it X-Men themed with great graphics, but its play field seems to consist of tons of great Magneto themed game play twists!  While thumping away as our favorite super heroes, we experienced enough challenge to keep pinball wizards busy at their local bar, arcade, or in their beloved game room for hours.

Additionally, I’m not sure which impressed me more, seeing a new X-Men pinball machine or realizing that Stern Pinball is still dedicated to developing new machines.  It was great to meet Waison (Go Blue!) at the 2012 San Diego Comic-Con.  You’ve got to hand it to these guys for keeping pinball alive and growing!

If you haven’t already, check out this new machine at http://www.sternpinball.com

 

The Harper Star Wars Collection

Who doesn’t love a good Star Wars collection?!  I recently met Thomas Harper and was able to tour his private collection.  Best part is, unlike many collectors who squirrel their treasures away in closets and boxes, Thomas has dedicated the time and space within his home to display his entire collection.  Plus, he was kind enough to let me photograph it and to answer some questions.

 

VGM:  You have a ton of great Vader stuff!  Why Darth Vader?

Thomas:  I always liked the villains as a kid.  Seeing Vader just come into battle was awesome…seriously bad ass!  I’ve got a bunch of Boba Fett stuff for pretty much the same reason.

 

VGM:  I have to hand it to you for getting your collection displayed.  You must move a lot for the military.  That can’t be easy for a collector, is it?

Thomas:  Setting it all up is a ton of work, and the small stuff is absolutely maddening.  It’s so hard to find a place for everything.

 

VGM:  How’d you get into collecting Star Wars stuff?

Thomas:  My dad was a comic book art collector.  He definitely helped get me into it.

 

VGM: With most of your toys being from the 90s, have you ever thought about collecting the older ones as well?

Thomas:  I get asked all the time, why don’t you do the vintage stuff?  It’s a cost thing.  If I got into that, the cost would go way up.

 

VGM:  What are you collecting now?

Thomas: I’ve hit the end of most of my figure collection. Now I’m going for autographs. They’re all personalized to me, so I know that they’re not worth much.  It’s great to go to a convention and get autographs. It feels like a good accomplishment, and it’s easy to take back.  At one convention I forgot that I had to mail out a big item, took a taxi and got to UPS a second before it closed. I spent $40 shipping the figure, and that’s about what I paid for it.  I think it was a Micro Machines Death Star in Fort Wayne. It was nuts, I had to take a cab, mail the package, and catch a flight in less 2 hours.

 

VGM:  While getting autographs, who was your favorite person to meet?

Thomas:  I was just about to deploy to Iraq, and I got to talk to Mark Hammel. I mentioned that I was going to Iraq, and he said something like, “I’m glad you’re not going to Afghanistan–where the empire goes to die.”  When I mentioned the Iraq deployment to a tipsy Billy Dee Williams (Lando Calrissian), Lando replied in a slurred but concerned tone, “That’s terrible man. That’s terrible.”

 

VGM:  How does collecting Star Wars work out for you in dating?  Has that ever worked in your favor?

Thomas:  At this point, I’ve realized that I just need to put it out there. If she’s not going to be ok with it, then it’s not going to work out anyway.

VGM:  From one collector to another, I’m with you on that one.

 

VGM:  Lots of collectors collect all sorts of items.  Do you collect anything besides Star Wars?

Thomas:  I’ve been thinking about collecting NES stuff.

VGM:  Good man…  Incredible Star Wars collection!  Thanks so much for the tour!  Oh yeah, and if your rancor goes missing, I swear it wasn’t me.

Have any followup questions or comments for Thomas Harper?  Feel free to leave one below in the comments section.  In the meantime, feast your eyes on these pretties…

Cheetahmen Fever!

“I saw an internet article on the 10 most valuable games in the world.  Mine was on it, and it was a prototype!”

Shortly after making that realization, Greg Pabich contacted me at VideoGameMuseum.com and several other forums.  The man was on a mission.  He wanted to figure out what he had and what he should do with it.  Not only was Greg able to confirm that he had a unique prototype, but upon testing it, he also realize that he had an entirely different Cheetahmen game from that which was released on the normal version of the Action 52.  He’d discovered the long lost Action Gamer.

While he first contemplated auctioning it off, “The more I became involved in it, the more I learned about the fact that it could be duplicated.”   It wasn’t long before Pabich’s entrepreneurial imagination took off.  He loved the reaction people were giving Cheetahmen on the internet.  “What gets me is that people either hate the game or go peeing-your-pants crazy about it!”

“All I’ve done is taken a game that everyone loves to hate and that isn’t very playable by today’s standards, and I’ve tried to create value and added value.  I’ve done everything to make it a full-scale professional game:  a nice box, high-end t-shirts, CDs with cheetah music, posters, hologram label, etc.  I’ve been working on an entertaining website.  I’m trying to tell the story, to convey history, and to entertain people.”

So what exactly has Greg Pabich been working on?  Well first off, not everything is finalized.  However, he’s put together two purchasable “Cheetahmen: The Creation” packages:   a Special Collector’s Edition and a Regular Edition.

Cheetahmen: The Creation Special Collector’s Edition includes the following:

  • Factory-sealed game (clear cartridge) and box
  • Unsealed game (green cartridge) and box
  • Classic Cheetahmen: The Creation Comic (reproduction)
  • “Cheetahmix” Music CD
  • “Audacious” Cheetahmen T-Shirt (Sizes Large or X-Large)
  • Cheetahmen Poster (Size: 15” x 9″, which will be folded in half to fit in the box)

This Collector’s Edition will be limited to a run of 500 sets.  Greg explains that the game cartridges, sealed-game box, and outer collector’s box will all have matching hologram serial numbers ranging from 1 to 500.

Cheetahmen: The Creation Regular Edition includes the following:

  • Factory-sealed game (red cartridge) and box
  • Classic Cheetahmen: The Creation Comic (reproduction)

Pabich explains that this edition of the game will be limited to 1000 games.  These will also be hologram-numbered and will follow the sequence of 501 to 1500.

Perhaps you’ve already preordered one of these sets.  But all this begs for a few questions to be answered:  Who on earth is Greg Pabich?  And what could inspire a person to wrap up his time, energy, and finances in such a project?  Is this what Cheetahmen fever looks like?

7-Eleven Game Rooms 

I had the opportunity to interview Mr. Pabich last week.  Greg explains that he was the marketing manager for 7-Eleven in South Texas during the late ’70s and early ’80s.  He helped to develop and market 7-Eleven’s line of popular breakfast burritos.  “It had to be something a person could eat with one hand while driving.”  It wasn’t long before Pabich made the leap from microwave food to gaming.  If you played an arcade machine at a South Texas 7-Eleven, chances are, Pabich helped to put it there.  He worked to develop game rooms in his stores.  Originally 7-Eleven stores had pinball machines but no dedicated space for them.

“The idea was to get game machines out of the storefront area.  We needed a dedicated space for pinball; electronic video games were just coming out.  Those were going gangbusters!  I added mirrors to rooms, changed lighting, added ash trays, and held game tournaments, which were tied into a Muscular Dystrophy Association.  That must have been about 1986 at its peak.”

Pabich’s original training wasn’t in electronics, computers, or anything gaming related.  “Before 7-Eleven, I got a degree as an accountant and did that for a few years, but I really didn’t like it.  As a creative entrepreneur, I wanted to do something more.”  Pabich did just that.  He purchased a convenience store and built a dozen more.  “I was reading an article in Time magazine on Pong, and I was fascinated by it.  Atari was out of Los Gatos, CA in 1974 if I remember correctly.  There wasn’t any internet or Google.  I had to track down someone who knew about it.”  Once Pabich got a hold of Atari, he ordered a machine for one of his stores.  “The response was weak.  People weren’t as enamored with it as I was.  I was 10 years too early.”  Eventually Pabich pulled the machine from his store and put it in his living room.  Sometime after that, he donated it to a school for the deaf.  “That was the beginning.  Looking back, I wish I’d held onto that arcade.”

Placing Arcades in Theaters

Pabich sold his convenience stores and was hired by a  gas station company to convert gas stations into convenience stores.  Following that job, he was hired by 7-Eleven as previously mentioned.  Pabich was having enough success with the game rooms at 7-Eleven that he started a side business.  Pabich got a contract to do the same sort of thing for a theater chain in the Houston, TX area and put games like Defender in the lobby.  These were immensely popularly.  “Games cost about $2,100, which was a lot of money.  But we could generally pay for a good game in about 17 days!”  Pabich went on to explain the monetization process.  “My company would have a key to open and service the machine.  The theater manager would have a key to the coin box, and there was a coin counter inside.  That kept everyone honest.”  He chuckled as he recounted, “There was one machine that wouldn’t play after a couple days, and the business owner called me complaining.  I came over to service it and found out it wasn’t working because it was packed full of quarters.  Apparently the same thing was happening all over the place.  These were so profitable that Texas limited our payout of machines to business owners to 50%.”

With 7-Eleven’s game rooms taking off as well, the 7-Eleven sold their gaming and equipment portion of the stores to a third-party business who offered to run it.  Pabich recounted that the business paid something in the millions-of-dollars range and went under about six month later.   No longer managing the gaming rooms, Pabich went back to focusing on his duties as marketing manager.   At about that same time, Pabich sold his theater arcade game business.

The Advent of VHS

“We was transferred to Austin in about 1982.  My daughter was about seven years old and was having a slumber party.  I tried to rent a VCR and a video and it was impossible to do.  You had to pay $100 to become a member, $4.95 to rent the movie, $9.95 to rent a VCR, and no one had any of them available.  Those were the early days of VHS.”  Pabich explained, “If you can’t get anything for love or money and there’s that much demand, then there’s money to be made.”

Pabich found a guy who wanted to place videos in 7-Elevens.  “We tried this in two stores.  There weren’t many new releases at this time compared to today where new movies come out on video every day.  Within a year, there were video stores popping up everywhere.”  He kept feeding the idea to corporate.  It cost $20,000 to outfit a 7-Eleven to rent movies.  Movies had to be purchased new at a cost of $70-90, and “We didn’t have good tracking systems at this time, since there weren’t computer systems or anything for that.  Our test stores were doing well.  People were renting a movie, buying things, bringing it back, and buying things again: beer, chips, soda, etc.  However, at $20,000 times 7,000 stores nationwide (900 in Texas), it was too much money even for 7-Eleven.

Resigning from his job at 7-Eleven with the agreement that he could get a contract for 7-Elevens in Texas, Pabich raised money and found a distributor for used movies  out of Portland, Oregon.  His new company V.D.O. installed video rental in 200 stores.  At the same time, Pabich helped a friend Jerry Welch get a job as president of a similar company Stars to Go Inc.  Pabich eventually took a job working as the VP of Development of that company.  “We immediately moved the corporate headquarters to Los Angeles.”  He signed contracts for 35,000 convenience stores throughout the US: Circle K, Wawa food stores, some 7-Elevens, etc.  “The contract required a minimum monthly payment by the stores.  We took that to the bank and financed the contract.”  Things were doing well until Black Thursday in 1986 when the stock market dropped.  “Our stock dropped from $27 to 13 cents, and Blockbuster went public.  I was out of a job in 1987.”

Rags to Riches

Being unemployed, Pabich saw a magazine ad for a guy buying used movies.  “I called the guy and asked what he was looking for.  I knew used movies were worth about $25 each.  Then I contacted a friend who was still at Stars to Go.  He said he’d send me a couple pallets of used VHS tapes and that I could pay him once I sold them.  Next thing I knew, there were 8,000 VHS tapes delivered on my driveway.  They filled the garage.  I had no idea what I had, so my family and I manually created lists, collated the lists by hand, and then I called this guy.  I Xeroxed my handwritten list and FedEx’d it to him. He wanted to buy them all at $11.25 each!  I shipped them all UPS COD and got paid with a cashier’s check.  I made $65,000 on the first deal.”  In that move his new business Movies & Games 4 Sale was launched!

Pabich must have an understanding wife, because he explained that his next order of VHS tapes filled not only the garage but also his living room.  According to Pabich, he then rented a warehouse, which led to a $25,000,000/year business with 127 people on payroll, and a 30,000 square foot warehouse.  “Blockbuster was killing mom and pop’s stores.  We would buy out inventory from closing stores and resell it to new Blockbusters.  Then people started asking for games.  I had trouble finding anyone who had a lot of games since that was just getting started.”  Pabich approached Babbage’s and encourage them to buy used games.  “I felt that people would only buy a car if they could trade in an old one.”  They merged with Software Etc which became NeoStar Retail.  “I handled their trade-in program, and I was the largest creditor as NeoStar declared bankruptcy.  There were bids for who would buy, and I got to put in my preference for Barnes & Noble.  They paid me $1.3 million.”  Eventually, Barnes & Noble would create the gaming giant GameStop.  According to Pabich, they did so by adopting his model of buying used games.  He notes that he also had a buyback program with Toys R Us.  “I was the only guy back then who could handle the quantity.”

From Prototype to Collector’s Edition

As perhaps any retro gaming geek would be, I’ve been intrigued by this game, its story, and Pabich’s process of bringing Cheetahmen: The Creation to the light of day.  In putting all this together, Pabich explains, “I’ve met a lot of interesting people.  The guy who did the commercial did a great job.  I have a friend who did the artwork, who did a fantastic job.  Most have been quite helpful and positive.   Uncle Tusk has handled boxes, comics, posters, box label printing, and game label printing and has done a fantastic job!  I was amazed at the quality of his work.  RetroZone has handled the cartridges.”

Hearing Pabich’s story, it’s no wonder to me that he managed to meet the infamous Vince Perri and to obtain the earliest known Action 52 prototype.  As a reminder, his prototype contains a unique early version of Cheetahmen called Action Gamer.  “This game seems to be the turning point at which Vince put real time into the game, developed an idea of franchising a character, comic, and cartoon.  I’m trying to capture that.”

Pabich’s history is full of his taking ideas and opportunities and running with them.  As I try to put my finger on his motivations for turning his prototype into playable NES cartridges, it seems clear.  Pabich is an entrepreneur.  He’s a risk taker who isn’t afraid to invest his own money, time, and pride into something as crazy as releasing a new playable Cheetahmen cartridge.  Will he sell his 1,500 Cheetahmen: The Creation sets?  Are there enough hardcore collectors out there to buy these?  Will there be a new surge of Cheetahmen fever?

As a retro gamer and collector, I’m excited to see anything new land itself in a playable 8-bit NES form.  Overall, I’m personally fascinated by all of this and am intrigued to see how it all unfolds.  For those of you following this as well, it gets better.  Pabich is working on more Cheetahmen projects as I write this.  Yup, that’s true Cheetahmen fever!

 

 

References:

7-Eleven Photo: Image via Flickr: jacob botter

Plotkin, Hal. “A Blockbuster Video Idea.” Inc. Magazine 15 October 1997. http://www.inc.com/magazine/19971015/1482.html 20 October 2011.

“Space-Age Pinball.” Time Magazine 1 April 1974. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,904070,00.html 20 October 2011.

VHS Pile Photo: Photo via MakeLessNoise

Weber, Mark. “NES Action 52 Prototype Cart?” VideoGameMuseum.com 3 June 2010. http://www.videogamemuseum.com/2010/06/03/nes-action-52-prototype-carts/

Weber, Mark. ” What’s Rarer: A Prototype Action 52 Cart or a Person Who’s Met Vince Perri?” VideoGameMuseum.com 24 June 2010. http://www.videogamemuseum.com/2010/06/17/whats-rarer-a-prototype-action-52-cart-or-a-person-who-met-vince-perri/

Weber, Mark. ” The Evolution of the Action 52.” VideoGameMuseum.com 3 June 2010. http://www.videogamemuseum.com/2010/06/24/the-evolution-of-the-action-52/

 

History of 3D Gaming

Curious about the history of 3D gaming? Here’s a fantastic interview on 3D gaming history by Jason Reed at Wizard World’s Anaheim Comic Con 2011! This interview highlights the following 3-D video game milestones as well as Nintendo’s early roots in motion gaming:

  • 1983 Vectrex 3D Imager
  • 1987 Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), Square Enix’s 3D Anaglyph Glasses for the games 3-D World Runner & Rad Racer
  • 1987 Nintendo Famicom, 3D System
  • 1988 Sega Master System, 3D Glasses
  • 1995 Nintendo Virtual Boy

Interview with Mark Weber of videogamemuseum.com from Highlight Media on Vimeo.

We’d like to thank Jason for the overwhelming surprise of putting this all together. The quality of this video and interview speaks for itself. Well done and many thanks!